It’s an acknowledged fact of the globalization era that pretty much everyone likes Chinese food: From Accra to Zagreb, it’s not hard to find a decent Cantonese or Sichuanese restaurant. So why do the Chinese, so adept at replicating and re-engineering everything from Caterpillar bulldozers to iPads, find it so stubbornly difficult to replicate a McDonald’s for local food? Read more in Foreign Policy.

"They have achieved such rapid growth and they have grown so fast, almost on steroids. There’s a part of them that still thinks of themselves as this poor country, that’s got all these problems: ‘The United States is the big cheese out there, trying to dictate things, perhaps trying to contain our rise.’ And so I think what you’re seeing inside of Chinese leadership is the desire to maybe continue not to be responsible, not to be a full stakeholder, work the international system on something like trade or intellectual property rights, get as much as they can. … At the same time, a growing nationalist pride where they say, ‘Yeah, we’re big too and we should be seen as equals on the world stage."

President Obama spoke with PBS’ Charlie Rose about China’s rise on Monday night. (via cbrmagazine)

The anti-Chinese flak over the proposed takeover of Smithfield Foods Inc. has hit close to home for the pork company’s CEO. “My sister said to me, ‘You’re selling out to the Communists?’ ” C. Larry Pope, Smithfield’s chief executive and president, said Wednesday. “…My mother said, ‘Couldn’t you pick somebody else?’ “

Americans, Pope said, “have been trained to dislike and distrust China. We’re afraid that the Chinese are taking over the world and America with their products and their minds.”

But in an hourlong interview, Pope emphasized that he thinks the proposed $7.1 billion acquisition by Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd. - China’s largest meat processor - would benefit the United States and strengthen Smithfield, adding jobs to help satisfy China’s appetite for pork without endangering food safety in the United States.

"We have rapidly gone from cyber not being mentioned in public to being discussed politely in private and now being smack bang at the top of the public agenda."

John Podesta, chairman of the Center for American Progress, told the Financial Times. (via cbrmagazine)

"I have always thought that something big should happen between China and the United States. There’s too much pork in the U.S. and too little in China."

— Joseph W. Luter III, chairman of Smithfield Foods, told the Wall Street Journal. Read more about how the deal between Smithfield and Shuanghui International Holdings took shape over time. (via cbrmagazine)

cbrmagazine:

According to a new Pew Research Center poll findings not yet released in a report, 52% of Americans have an unfavorable opinion of China, while just 37% express a favorable view. Read more.

cbrmagazine:

According to a new Pew Research Center poll findings not yet released in a report, 52% of Americans have an unfavorable opinion of China, while just 37% express a favorable view. Read more.

"In the race to be the world’s dominant economy, Americans have at least one clear advantage over the Chinese. We’re much better at branding."

New York Times Op-Ed Columnist David Brooks. (via cbrmagazine)

Tags: China branding

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cbrmagazine:


Measured in bulk, the United States’ top exports to China last year were agricultural products, transportation equipment, computers and electronics, chemicals, and machinery, but a deeper dive into specific products reveals a lot about America’s trade relationship with China.  Most of the United States’ largest exports to China consist of crops or raw materials, but other higher-value products like vehicles and aircraft are also growing. Read more in China Business Review.

cbrmagazine:

Measured in bulk, the United States’ top exports to China last year were agricultural products, transportation equipment, computers and electronics, chemicals, and machinery, but a deeper dive into specific products reveals a lot about America’s trade relationship with China.  Most of the United States’ largest exports to China consist of crops or raw materials, but other higher-value products like vehicles and aircraft are also growing. Read more in China Business Review.

cbrmagazine:

The 10 States Exporting the Most Goods to ChinaIn 2012, the United States exported $108.6 billion worth of goods to China, making it the third-largest US export market, according to a recent report by the US-China Business Council. (USCBC is the publisher of the China Business Review.) China ranked as one of the top three export markets for 34 states, and 30 states exported more than $1 billion worth of goods to China. And since 2009—when US exports to China dipped slightly because of the global economic slowdown—12 states have doubled their exports to China.The top 10 states exported $59.9 billion worth of goods to China in 2012, accounting for more than half of all US exports to China.(Photo of the Port of Galveston by KM&G-Morris via Flickr)

cbrmagazine:

The 10 States Exporting the Most Goods to China

In 2012, the United States exported $108.6 billion worth of goods to China, making it the third-largest US export market, according to a recent report by the US-China Business Council. (USCBC is the publisher of the China Business Review.) China ranked as one of the top three export markets for 34 states, and 30 states exported more than $1 billion worth of goods to China. And since 2009—when US exports to China dipped slightly because of the global economic slowdown—12 states have doubled their exports to China.

The top 10 states exported $59.9 billion worth of goods to China in 2012, accounting for more than half of all US exports to China.

(Photo of the Port of Galveston by
KM&G-Morris via Flickr)